Beidaihe Excursion

Hi all, food and money have been pushed back, since these past few days CET Harbin students all took a trip to Beidaihe. Beidaihe is a fairly well known destination in China, it’s along the seaside fairly close to Beijing.

To get there (and back) we took the train. Since the train ride is 12 hours from Harbin to the station nearest Beidaihe, we were in bunks overnight. I personally was looking forward to this, as Chinese trains are often included in various textbooks as they are a very common and convenient way to travel in China.

The setup
The view while laying down (only the lowest bunks have enough room to sit up) in my middle bunk on the way.

After arriving we went to breakfast at a picturesque little area made/kept fairly classically Chinese looking.

A tree full of crickets in cages, considered lucky in China

We then went to LaoLongTou or Old Dragon Head, where the Great Wall originally had an end into the ocean. The original is no longer standing, but a replica from (I think) the 1950s is great fun and a beautiful spot. LaoLongTou was also where troops were once kept, and also has an area to see recreations of historical buildings for that purpose.

The stables
The jail for soldiers who broke laws or camp rules
A bed for an upper level man and his wife
A recreation of a meeting of upper level officers
The Old Dragon Head reaching into the sea
The view of the beach from inside the Dragon Head
The view of the beach from out at the end of the Dragon Head
Me inside the Old Dragon Head (in the window)
Walking along the beach with friends
Paintings of dragons at the Old Dragon Head

After that, we bussed to Beidaihe where we had the afternoon to do as we pleased. I went to the beach (which was across the road from our hotel) with several others and walked along the water as well as spiking out from some rather large boulders. In the evening we went to a nearby amusement park type place called Biluota where they were holding a bonfire and had a DJ.

Our hotel, as seen from the beach
New Facebook Profile Pic? (unseen, about 20 other similar shots)
A sculpture on the beach that captured my attention
Our lovely program director brought S’mores makings to the bonfire! (A very American thing in China)
One of the funniest things in China is when signs also have English
The Five Star Toilet sign had several of us wondering if there were other restrooms that were not worthy of five stars (though it’s an accurate translation of the chinese name as well)

The next day we went to Lianfengshan or Lianfeng Mountain in the morning and a Hot Springs in the afternoon. It was really refreshing to visit the hot springs after walking around (not very tall but very beautiful) mountains in the morning.

The view from the top of LianFeng Mountain
The top of LianFeng Mountain
Stairs to the mouth of a cave, inside of which is a statue of a reposing Buddha
The entrance to the Hot Springs
The hot springs!
They had a swim cap rule, which I don’t think anyone particularly liked, but we followed

The next (and last) day we didn’t have any special plans. I woke up early to join a group to see the dawn, and later I went with a group to walk around Beidaihe and see a bit more of the area.

Collecting seashells by the sea shore
A shop with sea-themed trinkets and gifts had these animals made from shells, so cute!
A park with excessive equipment (meant for all ages) is not an uncommon sight here
A place to rest in the park
The park entrance
Interesting Russian inspired architecture
Waiting for the train!

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3 Comments

  1. What an adventure, Lily! I love Old Dragon’s Head. And the shore and water was beautiful. I can’t imagine two overnight train rides- so fun. Thank you for an amazing post and all the photos!

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